When Good Sites Go Bad: The Growing Risk of Website Accessibility Litigation

Posted In - Legal Library
November 15, 2019
Website Accessibility
Website Accessibility

For a growing number of companies, websites are not only a valuable asset but also a potential liability risk. In recent years, the number of website accessibility lawsuits has significantly increased, where plaintiffs with disabilities allege that they could not access websites because they were incompatible with assistive technologies, like screen readers for the visually impaired.

If you have never asked yourself whether your website is “accessible,” or think that this issue doesn’t apply to your company, read on to learn why website accessibility litigation is on the rise, what actions lawmakers and the courts are taking to try to stem the tide, how to manage litigation risk, what steps you can take to bring your company’s website into compliance, and how to handle customer feedback on issues of accessibility.

The Growing Risk of Website Accessibility Litigation

In recent years, there has been a nationwide explosion of website accessibility lawsuits as both individual lawsuits and class actions. Plaintiffs have brought these claims in federal court under Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and, in some cases, under similar state and local laws as well. In 2018, the number of federally-filed website accessibility cases skyrocketed to 2,285, up from 815 in the year prior. In the first half of 2019, these cases have increased 51.7% over the prior year’s comparable six-month period, with total filings for 2019 on pace to break last year’s record by reaching over 3,200.

Why Website Accessibility Litigation is on the Rise

The ADA was enacted in 1990 to prevent discrimination against people with disabilities in locations generally open to the public (known as public accommodations). The ADA specified the duties of businesses and property owners to make their locations accessible for people with disabilities, but it was enacted before conducting business transactions over the internet became commonplace. With the rapid growth of internet use, lawsuits emerged arguing that websites were places of public accommodation under the meaning of the ADA.

For Further Information: https://www.natlawreview.com/article/when-good-sites-go-bad-growing-risk-website-accessibility-litigation

ADA Shield® by INNsight
Copyright © 2017-2020
All Rights Reserved
Hotel Web Accessibility
Defined. Simple & Affordable.
ADA Title III, WCAG 2.1 & Section 508